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a.c. unleashed!!!


16 Apr.1853-16 Apr.2002

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Here is a simple and straightforward page about Indian Railways a.c. electric engines. With nearly 25% of IR's total route mileage now under the wires, (2001), the ac beasts have all but taken over most of the juiciest assignments on trunk and major routes.

The French SNCF pioneered the use of ac traction in India in 1959 and helped the IR take the first steps, although they were by no means the initiators. The earliest a.c. electrification projects actually commenced in Eastern India, in the Asansol-Gomoh-Gaya area. The Asansol-Andal stretch was completed the following year.Due to the SNCF connection, the first ac engines were French built, and the French influence was very strong in the earliest ac electrification technology and systems as well. The Howrah-Bardhamman(Burdwan) section, which had been electrified on 3000V dc,was also subsequently converted to 25,000V ac. Electrification on 25 KV ac continued in dribs and drabs onwards till Kanpur between 1968 and 1972. The ac electric wires subsequently stretched right upto New Delhi by the mid 1970s, and the Howrah-Delhi line became the first ac electrified trunk route in the country.

The mg main line between Chennai (Madras) and Villupuram followed next. Work commenced in 1968, and was completed a couple of years later. The rest is history. Under IR's current policy of electrifying all the trunk and major traffic carrying routes, energization (on 25,000 V ac, of course) continues at a feverish pace, and as already stated, has covered nearly 25% of the total route mileage. Only a small pocket of around 400 km in the Bombay area remains under dc traction. The conversion of this too into 25,000 V ac is underway, with work scheduled to finish by 2002. An occasional sighting of a WAP/1 electric locomotive in Mumbai (Bombay) has been reported, and ac engines all but touch the city proper, having been sighted at the not too distant suburbs of the megapolis. It appears that before very long, only the Calcutta trams and the underground metros will remain under dc traction. Without a doubt, ac electric traction seem to be the chosen mode of traction for the future.

Without further ado, lets jump straight into the photo gallery, and meet the ac workhorses.

Enjoy!


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A WAG/1 at Madras Central. She has probably just brought in a stopping passenger train from a nearby town.

1- 2. India's first ac engines were French built, of classes WAG/1 for goods and WAM/1formixed operations. Pic on the left shows a   WAG/1 at Madras Central in 1992, at the head of the passenger platforms, while the right pic shows another WAG/1 at Arakonam in 1995, about to return to Chennai (Madras) with a long train of empties. The first Indian built WAG/1 named 'BIDHAN' was retired to the National Rail Museum, New Delhi in 2000. The engines were laregly built by Alsthom. In their last years, the WAG/1s were relegated to working slow stopping passenger trains and empties.

An elderly WAG/1 at Renigunta about to leave for Madras with a train of empty box cars.

The first Indian-built WAG/1 'BIDHAAN' now enjoys her retired life at the National Rail Museum, New Delhi.

3.The first Indian built WAG/1 named 'BIDHAN' was retired to the National Rail Museum, New Delhi in 2000. Here is 'BIDHAN' resting easy at the NRM. (Photo Courtesy: Satish Pai).

Note French features like common aspect/tail lamp casing and buffers shaped like an elongated .D'.

4. The earliest machines featured several European (read French) features, like common casing for aspect/tail lamps and buffers shaped like an elongated 'D',as seen in this print of a WAM/1. They were later 'Indianized' by fitting of a cowcatcher,CBC couplers, typical tail/marker lamp twin assembly,and a large roof-mounted searchlight type of headlight. (see WAG/1 above.) India's first WAM/1 named JAGJIVAN RAM was retired to the National Rail Museum in 1999. The WAM/1s were initially classed BBM/1 and were largely buily by Alsthom. (Photo scanned from a magazine circa 1980).

5. India's first WAM/1 named JAGJIVAN RAM was retired to the National Rail Museum in 1999. The WAM/1s were initially classed BBM/1 and were largely buily by Alsthom. All these classes are limited to the ER and NR. JAGJIVAN RAM is seen here resting easy at the NRM in 2001. (Photo Courtesy: Satish Pai).

India's first WAM/1 'JAGJIVAN RAM' seen here enjoying her retired life in the National Rail Museum, New Delhi.

6. The WAG/2 and WAM/2 followed next,from Hitachi. Here is a picture of WAG/2s going through the works in Japan. These Japanese built machines had a slanting windshield profile, and were slightly more air smoothed than their European built cousins. (Photo scanned from a Japan Embassy booklet circa 1968).

A WAG/2 going through the works in Japan. The powerpak is being put in place.

7. The WAM/2 were identical machines to the WAG/2s, and some were fitted with elyptical buffers. Some of the WAM/2s were fitted with high speed bogies and reclassed as WAP/2. All these classes are limited to the ER and NR. Here is a WAM/2 outside Asansol shed in 1999, with another member of its class barely visible to the left. This machine has one elyptical buffer and one normal round one! (Photo Courtesy: Shanku Niyogi).

A decreipt WAM/2 outside the Asansol shed in 1999. Some of these beasts were fitted with modified bogies and were classed WAP/2.

A dimunitive YAM/1 rests easy at on a cloudy afternoon at Madras Egmore. Thanks to regauging of the line out of Egmore to bg, it is no longer possible to see these engines at this station. (2000).

8. The dimunitive mg YAM/1s were similar looking machines, but without the multiple unit cables. Here is a rather juvenile looking YAM/1 resting easy at Madras Egmore on a cloudy afternoon in 1986. With regauging of the entire mg main line in progress, the YAM/1s are merely marking time. They no longer run upto Egmore (2000) and terminate their journey at the suburban Tambaram station, some 35 km away.

9. The French machines were sought to be built in India, and the WAG/4s were born. They were merely Indian built versions of the earlier WAG/1, with the same Bo-Bo wheel arrangements but with some technical enhancements. Most of the WAG/4s are now based at Kanpur and Vijayawada. WAG/4A # 20937 is seen here in the Asansol shed on the ER, with another member of her class immediately behind. (Photo Courtesy: Shanku Niyogi).

The WAG/4s are fairly widespread near Cawnpore (Kanpur) on the NR. Here is a pair of WAG/4s at Asansol shed on the ER.

10. Although the French machines were very efficient and reliable, it soon became evident that some of their more sophisticated features like spring-borne traction motors were not suitable for Indian conditions. To the drawing board it was,and then emerged India's first home designed and home built class of electrics,the WAM/4. Here is a WAM/4p at Madras Central. the 'p' is supposed to denote regearing for fast express train workings. Also originating out of Madras are WAM/4p hauled push-pull expresses. Engines so fitted are classed WAM/4-6PD.(see # 54 below).

A WAM/4P about to leave Madras Central with the Madras-Dadar Express in 1992.

Some of the WAM/4s were given a lower gearing for heavy freight, and reclassed WAM/4B, later changed to WAG/5. Here is a WAG/5 approaching the MaulaAli level crossing in Hyderabad in 1996.

11. The WAM/4 was varied slightly, given a lower gearing for freight operations, and re-classed WAM/4B. This was later changed to WAG/5. Further improved and varied versions were WAG/5A,5B,5HA etc.Here is a WAG/5 approaching the MaulaAli level crossing in Hyderabad in 1996. Nowadays, with the advent of more powerful and specialized freight engines, most WAG/5s have been re-geared for fast express workings, and some have been reclassed as WAG/5P. The earlier WAG/5s were identical in appearance to the WAM/4s, later they were fitted with a modified side louvre window and grille profile, exactly like the WAP/1s.

The Bo0Bo0Bo WAG/6A was to have been India's freight locomotive of the future, but gave way to a more sophisticated design with three phase technology.

12- 13. Although more advanced versions of the WAG/5 were available, the IR felt the need for a very powerful ac locomotive of 6000 hp or more, where one locomotive could do the job of two or more conventional locomotives. A decision was taken to import technology, and the WAG/6A machines from ASEA, Sweden were the first to come in under this scheme. These had an unusual Bo-Bo-Bo wheel arrangement. Pic on the left shows a pair of these machines near Vishakapatnam, preparing to haul an iron ore rake at Bacheli on the Kirandul-Kottavalasa line. while the pic on the right shows a basic half height vestibule system for use when the locos are worked in multiple. The WAG-6A loco is of 6000hp and is thyristor-controlled. These locomotives are homed at Vishakapatnam.(Photo courtesy Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai.)

A basic half-height vestibule for use when two WAG/6As are coupled in multiple.

Close-up of the end bogie of the WAG/6A.

14 - 15.   The Bo-Bo-Bo WAG/6As are fascinating machines, and all are based at Vishakapatnam, for work on the steep Kirandul-Kottavasala line. Pic on the left shows a closeup of the end bogie of these locomotives, while the right pic. is a study of the centre bogie. These locomotives were to have been built in India, but they gave way to more sophisticated engines with 3-phase technology. (ref. WAG/9 at  below). (Photo courtesy Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai.)

Close-up of the middle bogie of the WAG/6A.

A WAG/6B_WAG/6C pair near Vishakapatnam.

16- 17.  Other contenders in the high hp locomotive race were Hitachi with their WAG/6B and a Hitachi-Bharat Heavy Electricals joint venture the WAG/6C. Both were Co-Co. Picture at the left shows a WAG/6B-6C pair near Vishakapatnam, while the pic on the right shows a WAG/6C at Waltair shed. The ASEA 6A was subsequently chosen, but that too gave way to a more modern design with 3 phase technology. The WAG/6B and 6C have full height vestibules as compared to the half height ones on the WAG/6A.  (Photo courtesy Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai.)

A BHEL built WAG/6C in the Waltair shed.

A very critical article about the imported locomotive deal in the Sunday magazine in 1988 had this accompanying b/w picture of the IR's own high hp product the WAG/7.

18 - 19. Politics always ruins the cake in India with narrow minded self serving politicians out for a kill to gain political mileage always trying to give a ruling Government a run for its money. Even as the intention of opting for the WAG/6A was being announced, politicians overnight became ace techno wizards and sparks flew over the choice of imported technology at prohibitive costs. At this time, India's own Chittaranjan works quietly outshopped its own 5000 hp heavy haul freight locomotive, the WAG/7. The engines were identical in appearance to the WAG/5s.  (Photo scanned from the Indian Railways Yearbook circa 1990(right) and the Sunday magazine circa 1989 (left)).

A couple of years later, this picture of a WAG/7 appeared in the Indian Railways Year Book. The WAG/7s were characterized by this gorgeous tri-color paint scheme for nearly two decades afterwards.

20. Turbulent initiation notwithstanding, the 5000 hp WAG/7 is now the standard workhorse for heavy freight in electrified territory all over the IR, and members of this class are seen in large numbers, at times even working in pairs. Here is one of the latest members of this class (circa 2001) at Allahabad (now Prayag). Note the low waist twin sealed beam headlights: a change indeed from the searchlight type roof mounted standard headlight. (Photo courtesy Prakash Tendulkar).

The WAG/7 is now the standard workhorse for freight in a.c. territory on the IR. Note modifications to the engine's front.

Along with modified front end, the WAG/7 livery also appears to have finally changed after nearly two decades.

21. Another new look WAG/7 # 27566 with low waist headlight and a refreshingly different sky blue/cream livery readies to leave Shakurbasti station near Delhi with a huge freight. WAG/7s were characterized for nearly a decade by their tricolor livery and angular stripes at each end, as seen above. (Photo courtesy Avimanyu Pyne).

A bi-current WCAM/1 runs through Nala Sopara station in Bombay in 1996.

22. Another variant of the familiar breed of Indian built electrics was the dual current WCAM/1, outshopped in 1974 to meet the specific requirements of the Western Railway, Mumbai (Bombay) division. On this track, dc is a mere 60 km from Mumbai (Bombay) Central to Virar, after which the line is ac right upto Delhi and Ahmedabad. The WCAM/1s switch from dc to ac and vice versa on a neutral section of track at Virar. These locomotives are not fitted for multiple operation. Here one of the units of this class is seen speeding through Nala Sopara station in 1996.However, due to their limited availability, they do not run all the way to Delhi,and give way to straight ac engines at Vadodara (Baroda).

23. Yet another variant was the high speed semi-streamlined WAP/1. This particular WAP/1 was outshopped in 1991, and named 'SUKANYA' in keeping with the International Year of the Girl Child. Note fitment of high speed pantograph. (Scanned from the IR yearbook circa 1991-92).

This WAP/1 was named 'SUKANYA' in keeping with the International Year of the Girl Child. (1991). Note fitment of high speed pantograph.

Five high speed versions of the WAP/1 were built. Initially classed WAP/1-FM II, they were later reclassed WAP/3.

24. Some of the WAP/1s were fitted with high speed bogies, and the powerpak marginally upgraded. Initially classed WAP/1 FM II, these beasts were later re-classed as simply WAP/3. They are capable of 160 kmph., but rarely run beyond 145 due to track and overhead equipment limitations. The first was christened 'JAWAHAR'. Jawahar is seen here heading the New Delhi- Bhopal Shatabdi Express. (Pic. scanned from the SCR timetable, circa 1992).

25. With faster, longer and heavier trains, a high power express engine was not far behind, and the WAP/4s (and later WAP/6s) were born. With 5000 hp under the bonnet, they are identical in appearance to the WAP/3s. This WAP/4 unit has just been outshopped from the Chittaranjan works. Note fitment of twin beam sealed headlight over the existing headlamp casing. This model was later drastically modified. (see # 48 below). Tge WAP/4s are now standard fare for all fast trains in the country. . (Pic scanned from the 'Indian Railways' magazine, circa 1999).

A new WAP/4 with twin beam sealed headlights, outshopped in 1999. The WAP/4s are now standard on all fast trains in a.c. territory on the IR. Their external appearance in now quite different.

26. The WAP/6 class was sought to be a more powerful and improved version of the WAP/4, with a 160 kmph speed potential. Only three were built. (read 'only three WAP/4s were modified as WAP/6s). Sadly, they did not live up to expectations, and did not clear oscillation tests. The Commissioner of Railway Safety clapped a 105 kmph max. speed restriction on them. The WAP/6s now spend their lives hauling slow expresses and local passenger trains, and are based at Asansol on the ER. Here is a WAP/6 just outside Asansol shed. (Photo Courtesy: Shanku Niyogi).

A handful of WAP/4s were modified, and were sought to be made as the high speed version capable of 160 kmph. These were classed WAP/6. Alas, they failed oscillation trials and were relegated to slow express duties with a max. speed of 105 kmph. A WAP/6 is seen here outside Asansol shed in 1999.

The powerful 6000 hp WAG/9 for freight. These locomotives were further modified and were classed WAG/9H. A WAG/9H passed oscillation trials in 2001 with a heavy freight train at 100 kmph.

27. As a replacement for the heavy haul ASEA WAG/6a Bo-Bo-Bos, the IR chose the more modern 6000 hp WAG/9 with 3 phase technology. Apart from the more modern feature, another factor that probably influenced this choice is that ASEA was subsequently merged with Diamler Benz and rechristened Adtranz. These locomotives are now being built in India, with a heavier WAG/9H model also having been outshopped. (1999). (Pic. scanned from the 'Indian Railways' magazine,circa 1996).

28.High power within a dimunitive Bo-Bo frame, the passenger version of the Adtranz locomotives is the Bo-Bo WAP/5. These machines are capable of 200 kmph and are already in charge of some of the country's fastest trains. They are now being built in India. (2000). (Pic. scanned from the 'Indian Railways' magazine,circa 1996).

The dimunitive Bo-Bo WAP/5s are now in charge of the fastest trains in India. With a speed potential of 160-200 kmph, some were tested at speeds of upto 180 kmph in 1998.

The d.c./a.c. WCAM/2 and the passenger version 2P were meant to replace the age-ing WCAM/1. Here is a WCAM/2 about to leave Wadala in Bombay in 2000.

29.The BHEL built dual current WCAM/2 (and its variant WCAM/2P) were outshopped in 1997. The external body profile largely resembles the WAG/6C Hitachi-BHEL joint venture design. This locomotive is fitted for multiple operation, however, it operates at a substantially lower power in dc territory. As such, this class is limited to the Western Railway out of Mumbai (Bombay), which is relatively flat terrain, and marks time till they will work as straight ac engines once conversion from dc to ac is complete. This unit is waiting to leave Mumbai (Bombay)'s Wadala Road station with a colorful container train.

30. The 5000 hp WCAM/3 is a more powerful dual current, and packs in more punch in dc territory, as it can work at negligible loss of power over dc lines. This class is now the mainstay on the entire Central Railway lines out of Mumbai (Bombay) VT, both towards Pune (Poona) and Manmad. These machines too mark time till the conversion to ac is complete, after which they will work as straight ac engines. This unit is leaving Pune (Poona) with the Udyan Express on the last leg of its journey to Mumbai. (Bombay).

While the WCAM/2s operate at substantially lower power in d.c. territory, the more powerful WCAM/3s pack in more punch on d.c. lines. Here is a WCAM/3 leaving Poona in 2000.

The WCAG/1s are the heavy freight versions of the WCAM/3, and they always work in pairs. This pair is running through Poona station in 2000.

31.The WCAG/1 pictured here is the heavy goods version of the WCAM/3 pictured above. They always run in pairs, and this pair is seen running through Pune (Poona) in July 2000 on its way back to Kalyan. The straight ac WAG/8 freight engines are identical machines externally, with the same color scheme. A pic of a WAG/8 is unfortunately not available with me at present.


A.C. Unleashed!!!  ---   PICTURE GALLERY

THE PICTURES WILL NOW FOLLOW A RANDOM PATTERN. Here is a collection of pictures of ac electric locomotives in action in India, mostly shot by me over the years.

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32. The WAM/1s were the mainstay of passenger services out of Howrah from the 1970s, and most were distinguishable by their typical ER green/black livery with red trim. WAM/1 20265 is seen here outside Howrah station. Note the odd shaped buffers and single aspect/tail lamp casing, referred to in caption to picture # 4. These engines were initially classed as BBM/1. One unit is preserved in the National Rail Museum, Delhi. (Photo Courtesy: Jishnu Mukherji).

A WAM/1 near Howrah in 1980. Note the French features like single aspect/tail lamp casings, buffers shaped like an elongated 'D' etc.

A.c. electrics of class WAG/5 and WAM/4 await their call of duty in the Basin Bridge shed in Madras in 1995.

33. Electric engines at Basin Bridge shed in Chennai (Madras). (shot from a passing train in 1995). Classes represented are WAG/5 (nearest camera) and WAM/4 (in the background).

34. This dimunitive YAM/1 # 21919 actually seems to bear a pathetic expression on here face as she is re-railed with the help of a new MFD break down car. The engine has completely run off the rails. The first YAM/1 outshopped by Hitachi in 1968 was named KING PALLAVA. (Photo Courtesy: John Lacey).

A sombre and actually pathetic expression on the face of this m.g. YAM/1 as she is re-railed at Madras with the help of a new MFD breakdown car.

A WAG/4 from the Cawnpore (Kanpur) shed rounds a bend in bright sunshine.

35. This picture appeared on a site on the web,and disappeared soon afterwards. It shows a WAG/4 # 21066 rounding a bend. The engine belongs to Cawnpore (Kanpur) shed. (Photo downloaded from a site on the web. Source site now defunct).

The Dadar-Madras Express about to leave Madras in 1992 behind a WAM/4P. I had just put my mother on the train.

36. A WAM/4P readies to leave Chennai (Madras) Central with the Dadar Express in 1992. I had just put my mother on the train. Some WAM/4s are being retrofitted with sealed twin beam headlights.

37. Skirting a beautiful lake just short of Renigunta on the Chennai (Madras)-Mumbai (Bombay) line, we encounter a WAG/5 hauled heavy freight on the opposite bank. (1995).

Greener grass on the other side? A long freight comprising of BCX class box cars threads its way on the opposite bank behind a single WAG/5 electric near Renigunta in 1994.

A WAM/4 headed train negotiates a very sharp curve outside Renigunta in 1994. The train goes right round the mountain, but does not actually climb it.

38.Our train negotiates a very sharp curve just short of Renigunta on the Chennai (Madras)-Mumbai (Bombay) line. (June 1995).A WAM/4 in light blue/navy livery is barely visible at the head of the train.

39. A famous Railway Board publicity photograph: a trio of WAG/5s heads a heavy ore train on the Kirandul - Kottavasala line on the SER. These engines have now been superceded by the WAG/6 class of engines. (see # 12 through 17 above). (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai).

A famous IR publicity photograph: a trio of WAG/5s head a heavy ore train on the Kirandul-Kottavalasa line near Vishakapatnam.

Encountering a train on the opposite track just outside Madras Central in 1995.

40 - 41. Having left Chennai (Madras) Central in 1995, we encounter a train on the opposite track.(left) . As the train approaches, the engine at turns out to be a WAM/4 from the BZA (Bezwada: read Vijayawada) shed. Note that the multiple unit cables have been removed on this unit (right).

The engine turns out to be a WAM/4 from Vijayawada. Note that the multiple-unit cables have been removed on this unit.

A heart rending scene of a badly damaged WAM/4 in 1999. Note that the engine has been retrofitted with sealed twin beam headlights.

42. This heart rending scene is a picture of a WAM-4 that was badly damaged after an accident in which it collided with a goods train while hauling the Bombay Mail (Dec. 1999. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai).

43. Business end of a WCAG/1 dual current freight locomotive as she runs through Pune (Poona) in July 2000. These engines will mark time till conversion of the Pune lines to ac is completed by 2002.

Business end of a WCAG/1 as she runs through Poona in 2000.

A sparkling clean YAM/1 moves in to take charge of the Madras Egmore-Tirunelveili Nellai Express in 1992. M.g. trains do not terminate at Egmore any more.

44. Showing off typical SR efficiency, a sparkling YAM/1 moves in to take charge of the Chennai (Madras)    Egmore - Tirunelveili Nellai Express.(May 1992). With the entire mg main line out of Madras beach having been regauged to bg under project 'unigauge', the YAM/1s now operate out of the suburban Tambaram station, and are marking time till they are rendered completely redundant when regauging is completed.

A WAG/5 raises dust as she passes by with a train of flats at Hyderabad in 1996.

45. A WAG/5 raises dust as it passes by with a train of empty flats at Hyderabad. (April 1996).

The public sector BHEL also built some WAG/5s. These were classes WAG/5HB. A member of this class is seen here heading an enormous freight.

46. The public sector giant Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. (BHEL) built a number of WAG/5s. These were fitted with Hitachi motors,and were classed WG/5HB. Here is a HAG/5HB # 24015 from Jhansi shed captured by Avimanyu Pyne at Tukhlakabad near Delhi with an enormous freight. (Photo Courtesy: Avimanyu Pyne).

47. A WAP/4 readies to leave Chennai (Madras) Central in July 2000 with the superfast Lalbaug Express to Banglaore. Note that the multiple unit cables have been removed on this unit. The newer WAP/4s are provided with collision resistant pillars in the end cabs and are fitted with sealed twin beam headlights.

A WAP/4 prepares to leave Madras Central in 2001 with the superfast Lalbaug Express to Bangalore.

A new look WAP/4 with recessed twin beam headlights and collision-resistant pillars in the drivers' cab arrives in Madras in 2001 with the Tamil Nadu Express from New Delhi.

48. A brand new WAP/4 with a completely new look arrives at Chennai (Madras) Central in 2001 with the superfast Tamil Nadu Express from New Delhi. This model is provided with collision resistant pillars in the drivers' cabs. (Photo Courtesy: Sridhar Shankar).

49. A WAG/4D # 21065 heads an enormous freight near Asansol on the ER. (Photo Courtesy: Shanku Niyogi).

An elderly WAG/4D is typical ER green/black livery heads a freight near Asansol in 1999.

A WAG/5 backs into the shed at Arakonam. Some of these freight engines have been re-geared for passenger workings and have been classed WAG/5P.

50. A WAG/5 backs into Arakonam shed. I shot this from a moving train in 1995. Although officially classed as freight engines, the WAG/5s are liberally used on express trains, including superfasts. Some have actually been re-geared for passenger workings and have been reclassed as WAG/5P.

Despite her decreipt and uncanny appearance, this WAP/1 meant business, and reached Madras Central at least 30min ahead of schedule!

51. A decreipt WAP/1, badly in need of a fresh coat of paint readies to leave Bangalore with the Brindavan Express in 1995. I rode the same train to Madras. As there was a local VIP on board, the train literally flew over the track, and reached Madras in 5 hr. 35 min. flat!

This very rare shot by Jishnu Mukherji shows a pair of WAP/1s about the leave Howrah with the Rajdhani Express to New Delhi.

52. Although the semi streamlined WAP/1 series of locomotives are fitted for multiple operations, they are generally never used in pairs. This very rare shot by Jishnu Mukherji shows a pair of WAP/1s about to leave Howrah station with the Rajdhani Express to New Delhi. (Photo Courtesy: Jishnu Mukherji).

53. A dimunitive YAM/1 prepares to leave Villupuram with the Cholan Express to Madras Egmore. She has just taken over from a YDM/4 diesel. (Nov. 1997).

With a milk tanker hooked up front, the Cholan Express is about to leave Villupuram for Madras behind a YAM/1.

A WAM/4-6PD readies to leave Bangalore with the Mysore-Madras Shatabdi Express. Note the additional multiple unit cables on this locomotive to work push-pull trains (to Tirupati) from Madras Central.

54. Close up of  WAM/4-6PD at Bangalore. The 'P' versions of the WAM/4s make them almost as good as the WAP/1s. Note the additonal m.u. cables on this unit for working push-pull trains (to Tirupati) out of Chennai.(Madras) Central.  (Photo by Sundar Krishnamurthy).

55. The WAP-7 is a high-speed passenger version of the WAG-9, with a service speed of 130km/h. These engines are undergoing trials on the Faridabad-Mathura section. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai).

Some of the 6000 hp AdTranz WAG/9 freight engines are being regeared for working 24-26 car trains at 140 kmph. These are classed WAP/7, of which this is one unit.

A senior official from India's Chittaranjan Works poses in from of the new WAG/7 locomotive before field trials.

56.  The WAP-7 and WAG-9H locomotives are recent models turned out by Chittaranjan Loco Works. Both are derivatives of the WAG-9 loco. iAn official (name witheld) from India's Chittaranjan works poses in front of the first prototype WAP-7 locomotive just before its first line trials. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai.)
57.  A picture of the trial special, hauled by a WAP-5, followed by oscillograph car, with the last vehicle being the vehicle under Oscillation Trial, viz. the LHB-Alstom make Coach (imported from Germany). A speed of 184km/h was touched with this special during last week of May' 2000 on Faridabad-Mathura section. These coaches will have a service speed of 160kmph. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai.)

A WAP/5 heads an oscillograph car and a new imported passenger car on high speed trials in May 2000. A top speed of 184 kmph was achieved.

A senior IR official and a AdTranz representative downloading and testing the WAP/7 software on the WAG/9 locomotive.

58.  A senior IR official  and an Adtranz employee in charge of locomotive programming who came to India to hand over the source code of the WAP-7 locomotive software. They are in the cab of WAG-9 #31023 at Gomoh, downloading and testing the WAP-7 software on the WAG-9 as the WAP-7 loco was not yet ready. . Below the laptop is the docking station containing necessary interface elements. The lever to the left of laptop is the asst. driver's horn handle. The whitish cable running down is the interface cable and connects the laptop to loco electronics. The truncated desk to the left is driver's desk. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai).
59.The WAG-9H is a heavier version (by 12 tonnes) of the WAG-9; the higher adhesive weight makes it suitable for hauling heavier freight rakes: 58-wagon BOXN rake, ~4,700 tonnes, on a 1:150 grade. Undergoing trials on the Ujjain-Nagda sectionn. (Photo Courtesy: Sujeet Mishra and Satish Pai).

The WAG/9H is a heavier version of the WAG/9. One of these beasts successfully completed oscillation trials with a heavy freight in June 2001 at 100 kmph.

In the light of all the glitz and glamor, the old designs toil on undettered, like this WAG/5 which returns to shed after bringing in an overnight train into Madras Central in 1999.

60. In the light of all the high tech glitz and razzmatazz, the tried and tested old designs toil on, undeterred, like this WAG/5A which has just arrived at Madras Central with an overnight train. (Photo Courtesy: Rangachari Anand).

61. A flexicoil suspension equipped WAP 6, taken fron an old issue of the IR mag. No other details of the loco were mentioned in the accompanying article. The only other locomotive which uses this type of high speed bogie (2002) is the WDP/2. (Photo Courtesy: Apurva Bahadur). 

wap6.jpg (92024 bytes)

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All material on this website is copyright S.Shankar. You are welcome to download any material from these pages for your own PERSONAL use, or for any non commercial applications. This includes downloading images for use on your personal website or making printouts and giving them out to your friends. The material is NOT TO BE USED FOR ANY COMMERCIAL PURPOSES whatsoever. In the event of your using any material from this site, all I ask is that you credit me with the information and drop me a line so that I can visit the items in their new home. Material from other sources has been used with prior permission from the owners of such material, and this has been duly acknowledged wherever applicable.

Last updated and expanded: 27 Sept. 2002. Page spun by S.Shankar with Microsoft FrontPage 98.

ACKNOWLDGEMENTS

A page with this amount of variety couldn't possibly have been built my me single handedly. My profound thanks to the following individuals who have so kindly contributed pictures and information towards making this page what it is today: Indivudial pictures have been acknowledged wherever in the caption:

Jishnu Mukherjee, Shanku Niyogi, John Lacey, Sujeet Mishra, Satish Pai, Avimanyu Payne, Sundar Krishnamurthy, Prakash Tendulkar, Sridhar Shankar and Rangachari Anand for their pictures.  Dr. K.J.Walker, Sujeet Mishra, Satish Pai for the additional information provided.

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(Representing the tri-color livery of the WAG/7 with white zebra stripes on the nose.)